Are you the trivia type? Here’s some info we bet you didn’t know… Break it out on the next long journey you’re stuck on… you’ll seem like the total whiz kid…

  • The Marangu Route on Mount Kilimanjaro (pictured) is nicknamed the Coca Cola Route, because it is the easiest trail up the mountain and Coke can be purchased along the trail.
  • The temperature difference between winter and summer extremes in the alleged world’s coldest city, Yakutsk might be up to 100°C or almost 200°F.
  • Winchester Cathedral (pictured) has the world’s largest gothic nave.
  • L’anse aux Meadows on Newfoundland is the only confirmed Viking settlement in North America and believed to be the landfall site of the Viking explorer Leif Eriksson.
  • Despite the name, french fries are proudly claimed as a Belgian invention.
  • Tim Ho Wan in Kowloon, is said to be the cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant in the world with Dim Sum dishes starting from about 1 USD.
  • Measured from its sea floor base to the peak Mauna Kea on Hawaii is the tallest mountain in the world. Neighboring Mauna Loa has a larger volume than any other mountain in the world.
  • The world’s first passenger railway began in the UK in 1807 and ran for 8km along the coast from Swansea city center to the suburb of Mumbles.
  • The “Extraterrestrial Highway” takes you to Rachel, Nevada, the closest inhabitation to the mysterious Area 51.
  • San Luis Obispo hosts the Bubble Gum Alley, where the walls are covered by old chewing gum.
  • The town Batman in eastern Turkey has not got its name from the superhero.
  • Maid-Rite Sandwich Shop, along U.S. Route 66, claims to have the first drive-thru in the United States.
  • Australia is home to six of the top ten deadliest snakes in the world as well as the deadliest spider, however the average tourist is unlikely to encounter any of these.
  • Salisbury cathedral boasts England’s highest spire.
  • If it’s the pirate’s life for you, head to Nassau’s Pirate Museum, a recreation of a Caribbean pirate town.
  • St. Sava in Belgrade is largest Eastern Orthodox church in the world.
  • The Arba-Rucun Mosque in Mogadishu is said to have been built by a direct descendant of the Prophet Muhammed.
  • There are 11 official languages in South Africa.
  • The first statue erected in honor of the musician Frank Zappa is situated in Vilnius, Lithuania.
  • According to legend, if you’re in Santiago de Compostela’s Praza da Quintana, formerly a cementery, at midnight you’ll be able to see all the persons that were buried there.
  • London, Ontario is named after Britain’s capital but you can also find a Picadilly Street, Covent Garden Market and Thames River there.
  • Sigulda’s bobsleigh track is also open in the summer – but you’ll ride on wheels instead of sliding on ice.
  • The world’s longest street is Yonge Street in Ontario, Canada, which runs from Lake Ontario to Lake Simcoe and is 1,896 km (1,178 mi) long.
  • The Gu Mountain temples near Fuzhou contain important Daoist archives written in monk’s blood.
  • The Shirgiz Khan Medressa in Khiva was built for Shigaziz Khan by slaves, who he promised freedom after its completion. When he went back on his word and gave them more work, they killed him inside it.
  • In Dalat you can choose sites based on your mood. Try the Valley of Love when you’re feeling good or the Lake of Sorrows when you’re feeling down.
  • At the end of the cocaine tour at the Coca Museum in La Paz, each visitor is given a coca leaf.
  • The currency of Eritrea is called the ‘nakfa’, named after the city of Nakfa where the Eritreans fought for their independence against Ethiopia.
  • According to legend, if you touch your zodiac sign on the Wishing Bridge in Tel Aviv’s Jaffa District while facing the sea and make a wish, it will come true.
  • The Original Pantry Cafe in Los Angeles boasts that it has never closed or been without a customer since it first opened in 1924.
  • The Bangladesh District of Yerevan was given its name because locals thought it was so far out of town and Bangladesh was used as a generic term for a “faraway place” in Armenia, like Timbuktu is used in the West.
  • The Chinese city of Weifang is known as the Kite Capital of the World offering a kite factory, kite museum, and of course, hosts an International Kite Flying Festival.
  • 820 different indigenous languages are spoken in Papua New Guinea.
  • Amsterdam has more bicycles than inhabitants: 800,000 bikes compared to just 750,000 people.
  • The Titanic was built in Belfast and was completed on April 2, 1912. To rebuild the ship today would cost a whopping $400 million.
  • A KLM 747-400 flight from Amsterdam to Australia carries an average of just over 1,000 kilograms of food, and some 1,324 litres of drink – from mineral water to wine and whisky.
  • Even though Bali is almost identical to arts and artists, Balinese language has no word for art and artist.
  • Indonesia has more than 300 ethnic groups and languages. However, most Indonesians converse in Bahasa Indonesia.
  • Every state in the USA has a town named Springfield.
  • The Shongololo Express — “shongololo” is the indigenous African word for millipede — is a perfect description of a fabulous train that winds its way from Victoria Falls to Johannesburg.
  • Brazil is only country named after a tree.
  • Between which two countries is the most frequently crossed border? United States and Mexico
  • Which country produces the largest number of films in the world? India
  • In which country does the McDonald’s restaurant chain serve apricot pies instead of cherry? New Zealand.
  • Bolivia has highest elevation airport in the world.
  • In Alaska 3-year-old boys are encouraged to smoke a pipe.
  • The original meaning of the word restaurant was ‘restorative soup.’
  • Egypt has 99 percent of its population living on less than 4 percent of its land.
  • What do the flags of Dominica, Mexico, Zambia, Spain, Kiribati, Fiji and Egypt have in common? They each have a bird.
  • 80 percent of the world’s entire population lives in the Northern Hemisphere.
  • The Netherlands is the only contry to have a national dog.
  • The Philippines which contain 7100 islands spread across 500,000 square miles, is the largest exporter of cocnut products in the world.
  • Since November 1989, 59 tons of Berlin Wall have been shipped to the US.
  • The only 2 countries that have participated in every Olympiad since its inception in 1896 are Greece and Australia.
  • The Atacama Desert in Chile gets less than one-half an inch of rain per year, yet Chile also contains one of earth’s rainiest places in its southern region.
  • At about 1.75 square miles, Pitcairn, in Polynesia, is the smallest island in the world with country status.
  • Guam has no sand and the roads on the islands are made with coral. The sand on the beaches is actually ground coral. When concrete is mixed, the coral sand is used instead of importing regular sand from thousands of miles aways.
  • Great Britain was the first to issue postage stamps
  • The first roadside motel opened in San Luis Obispo, California, in 1925. The room rate: $2.50 a night.
  • Jamaica has the largest number of churches per square mile in the world.
  • In which country do the children greet you by sticking out their tongue? Tibet
  • In 1431, the year Vlad Dracula was born, Joan of Arc was burned as a witch at the stake in Rouen, France.
  • Alaska, Hawaii, Maine and Vermont are the only states in America that have a ban on billboards.
  • Engineered in 1948 to cross previously impassable terrain, the Land Rover quickly became the vehicle of choice for safari guides and city slickers alike.
  • Borneo is the only island shared by three countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei.
  • At 3900 miles, the Yangtze is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world.
  • The three longest suspension bridges in the world are in Japan, Turkey and Denmark.
  • The Temple of Heaven was built in Beijing in 1420 without the use of a single nail.
  • The Statue of Liberty’s nose measures four feet six inches long.
  • Iceland had the first female president in the world, Vigdis Finnbogadóttie, elected in 1980.
  • Lake Nicaragua is the world’s only freshwater lake containing sharks.
  • Canada is an Indian word meaning “big village.”
  • Every litre of water in the Red Sea contains about 200 grams of salt.
  • Scotland, famous for golf, actually banned it in 1457 because it was a threat to archery practice and, therefore, to national defense.
  • The tallest and most active volcano in Europe is Mount Etna in Italy. The name Etna comes from the Greek aitho, meaning “I burn.”
  • France was the first country to produce brandy for wide-scale commercial sale.
  • Brazil is the only county to have played in every World Cup soccer tournament.
  • Andorra is the only country in the world to offer free postal services.
  • The volume of water in the Amazon river is greater than that of the next 8 largest rivers in the world combined.
  • Finland was the only country to repay its war reparations after WWI.
  • Australia doesn’t have an active volcano or a glacier – it is the only continent that lacks either one.
  • Antarctica is the only continent that doesn’t have land areas below sea level.
  • There are 1792 steps to the top of the Eiffel Tower.
  • The Ice Hotel in Jukkasjarvi in Swedish Lapland is a large igloo and includes a restaurant, cinema and wedding chapel.
  • The only country to have a single color flag is Libya.
  • 160 cars can drive side by side on the Monumental Axis in Brazil, the world’s widest road.
  • No word in the English language rhymes with silver, month, orange or purple.
  • In 1922, Pitcairn Airlines was the first to provide air sickness bags.
  • A new study has shown that there is only enough fish in the Loch to feed a creature weighing 31kg. THe scientists used sonar to estimate the number of fish in the lake and came up with an annual food supply of 93kg. Since a cold-blooded animal like the Loch Ness Monster would need to eat about three times its body weight each year, it could only weigh about 31kg.
  • The zoo in Tokyo closes for two months of the year so the animals can have a holiday from visitors.
  • The McDonald’s corporation has taken over from the US Army as the world’s world’s largest staff trainer.
  • The world’s longest escalator is in the Leningrad Metro. It is 120m long.
  • Dublin is home of the Fairy Investigation Society.
  • The Imperial Throne of Japan has been occupied by the same family for the last 1,300 years.
  • The Great Pyramid of Giza consists of 2,300,000 blocks each weighing 2.5 tonnes.
  • La Paz, Bolivia is so high above sea level that there is just enough oxygen in the air to support a fire.
  • Princess Ann was the only competitor at the 1976 Montreal Olympics that did not have to undergo a sex test.
  • Lions have been exported to Africa by Windsor Safari Park in England.
  • The word denim comes from de Nimes, Nimes being the town the fabric was originally produced.
  • When shipped to the US, the London Bridge was classified by US Customs as a “large antique.”
  • Harry S Truman became the President of the United States on 12 April 1945. The initial S in the middle of his name doesn’t stand for anything – both his grandfathers had names beginning with S and Truman’s mother didn’t want to offend either of them.
  • Australia is the only place in the world where dromedaries (packs of camels) still occur in the wild. In fact, they are regularly exported to the Middle East.
  • The world’s longest fence stretches from South Australia into northwest Queensland and down again to New South Wales in Australia.
  • The concept of minimum wage was established in Australia in 1907.
  • New Zealand proudly produces the most ice cream per capita in the world.
  • New Zealand is one of the most isolated land masses in the world and was the was the last to be peopled, only 1200 years ago.
  • Longest river: The Nile, in Egypt, at 6,695 kilometers (4,160 miles).
  • Christmas Island, a territory of Australia, has the world’s fastest population growth rate at 7.77%.
  • Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyll-llantysiliogogogoch. No, this is not a result of a broken keyboard. This is the longest city name in the world, found in North Wales. Its name translates as: “The church of St. Mary in the hollow of white hazel trees near the rapid whirlpool by St. Tysilio’s of the red cave.”
  • In Japan, the best beef costs around $80 per pound.
  • The wettest place on earth is Lloro, Colombia, which averages 13 meters (523.6 inches or 40 feet) of rainfall a year.
  • There is a street in Italy that is less than 1.5 feet wide.
  • In Tokyo, to buy a three-line classified ad in the newspaper costs $3,000 per day.
  • Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador supports the only equatorial glacier on the planet.
  • The Great Rift Valley, in eastern Africa, is the only geological feature on earth that can be seen clearly from space. At 4,000 miles in length, it stretches from Lebanon to the Mozambique Channel.
  • Need a shower? Look no further than the world’s highest waterfall, Angel Falls, in Venezuela. With a total height of 979 meters (3,212 feet), it is over 300 meters taller than the second-highest waterfall.
  • About 97 percent of the world’s water is in the oceans, which make up about two-thirds of Earths surface. Nearly 70 percent of the Earths fresh-water supply is locked up in the icecaps of Antarctica and Greenland. The remaining fresh-water supply, a mere 1 percent of the Earths total, exists in the atmosphere, streams, lakes, or groundwater.
  • Dust from space? Estimates vary, but the USGS says at least 1,000 tons of the stuff enters the atmosphere every year and makes its way to Earths surface.
  • The San Andreas Fault in California, which runs north-south, is slipping at a rate of about 2 inches (5 centimeters) per year, causing the city of Los Angeles to move towards San Francisco. Scientists forecast L.A. will be a suburb of San Francisco in about 15 million years.
  • Since the running of the bulls began in Pamplona, Spain, in 1926, only 13 people have been killed. Attendance at the 8-day event grew dramatically when Ernest Hemingway made the running of the bulls world famous in his novel “The Sun Also Rises.”
  • The Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii holds the title as the largest volcano on Earth. It rises more than 15.2 kilometers (50,000 feet or 9.5 miles) above its base, which which sits under the surface of the sea. But compare this to Olympus Mons on Mars, which rises 26 kilometers (16 miles) into the Martian sky.
  • Hottest recorded temperature on earth: 57.7 degrees Celsius (136 degrees Fahrenheit) at Al Aziziyah, Libya on September 13, 1922. Lowest recorded temperature: -89.2 degrees Celsius (-128 degrees Fahrenheit) in Vostok, Antarctica on July 21, 1983.
  • If you were to fly along the equator around the entire world, you would travel 40,075 kilometers.
  • The country with the highest population density? That would be Monaco with 15,538 people per square kilometer. Singapore is a distant second with 4,488.
  • Contrary to what you might think, the driest desert in the world is not the Sahara. In fact, it is the Patagonia Desert, found in the most southern region of South America. But the driest place goes to the village of Arica, in Chile, which gets just 0.03 inches (0.76 millimeters) of rain per year.
  • The highest tide differences can be found in Burntcoat Head, Minas Basin, part of the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada, where tides can range 11.7 meters (38.4 feet). The bay is funnel-shaped its bottom slopes upward continuously from the ocean inlet. The result is an extreme ‘tidal bore’, a wavelike phenomenon at the leading edge of the changing tide, which can travel up feeder rivers at 13 kilometers per hour (8 mph) and can be more than 1 meter (3 feet) tall.
  • border=0 valign=top> The busiest airport in the world? That would be Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with 79,086,792 passengers passing thru in 2003 alone.
  • One-third of the world’s land surface is desert.
  • If you came upon a naked Muslim woman, she would cover her face. A Samoan woman would cover her navel.
  • How far does regular dust blow in the wind? One study showed that African dust finds its way to the state of Florida and can help push parts of the state over the prescribed air quality limit for particulate matter. The dust is kicked up by high winds in North Africa and carried as high as 20,000 feet (6,100 meters), where its caught up in the trade winds and carried across the sea.
  • On average, about 400 billion gallons of water are used worldwide each day.
  • The longest tunnel in the world is the Seikan Tunnel in Japan at over 53.9 kilometers in length, connecting the islands of Honshu and Hokkaido (3.9 kilometers longer than the Chunnel).
  • The Leaning Tower of Pisa is 180 feet tall and now tipped over 16 feet to one side. Scientists estimate that it has approximately 100 years left before it collapses.
  • The smallest country in the world is Vatican City at (0.44 square kilometers (0.17 sq. miles).
  • The worlds deepest lake is Lake Baikal in the south-central part of Siberia at a depth of 1.7 kilometers (5,712 feet). Its about 20 million years old and contains 20 percent of Earths fresh liquid water.
  • The desert country of Saudi Arabia must import sand from other countries. Their desert sand is not suitable for building construction.
  • Hot water faucets are marked with a ‘C’ in some countries. This is because in Spain the word for hot is caliente, in France hot is chaud, and in Italy you say caldo when you mean hot.
  • The Earth is not a sphere – because the planet rotates and is more flexible than one might imagine, it bulges at the midsection, creating a sort of pumpkin shape. The bulge was lessening for centuries but now, suddenly, it is growing, a recent study showed. Accelerated melting of Earths glaciers is taking the blame for the gain in equatorial girth.
  • The longest mountain chain on Earth is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which splits nearly the entire Atlantic Ocean north to south. Iceland is one place where this submarine mountain chain rises above the sea surface.
  • Going diving? The deepest point in the ocean is the Challenger Deep, Mariana Trench, in the western Pacific Ocean at 10,924 meters (35,840 feet) below sea level.
  • All gondolas must be black in Venice. Only government officials are allowed fancy colors.
  • Largest lake: Caspian Sea in Asia/Europe at 371,000 square kilometers.
  • Japanese rickshaws were invented by an American, Reverend Jonathan Scobie, who visited Okinawa in 1869.
  • Groundwater comprises a 30 times greater volume than all freshwater lakes, and more than 3,000 times whats in the worlds streams and rivers at any given time. Groundwater is housed in natural underground aquifers, in which the water typically runs around and through the stone and other material.
  • The largest Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant is in Beijing, China.
  • In Tibet, some women have special metal instruments used for picking their noses.
  • Largest island: Greenland at 2,175,600 square kilometers.
  • The largest ocean is the Pacific Ocean, which covers 165 million square kilometers (64 million square miles). It is more than two times the size of the Atlantic and has an average depth of 3.9 kilometers (2.4 miles).
  • In Iceland, people are listed in the telephone directory by their first name.
  • There is a hell on Earth. It is Hell, a village in Norway.
  • The total area of the entire earth is 510,066,000 square kilometers (29.1% is land at 148,429,000 sq. km. and 70.9% is water at 361,637,000 sq. km.).
  • The Dead Sea, lying between Israel and Jordan, is the lowest place on earth. The surface of this body of water is 1,312 feet below sea level.
  • The fastest ‘regular’ wind was 372 kilometers per hour (231 mph), recorded at Mount Washington, New Hampshire, on April 12, 1934. But during a May 1999 tornado in Oklahoma, researchers clocked the wind at 513 kilometers per hour (318 mph).
  • The native language spoken by more people than any other is Chinese Mandarin at 874,000,000.
  • Rising seas: The Antarctic Ice Sheet holds nearly 90 percent of the worlds ice and 70 percent of its fresh water. If the entire ice sheet were to melt, sea level would rise by nearly 67 meters (220 feet), or the height of a 20-story building.
  • The Sahara Desert gets larger every day. Its southern border grows outward by 30 miles every year.

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